1012-2020

Published on Mondays, with columns by Artist and Writer. Published since 2002, an Ocean and Pounds publication

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Caffeine Reveries
by Shelley Savor


Everyone Stayed Inside

 

 

The Photograph
coordinated by Kamelia Pezeshki



Untitled by Tooran Zandieh

My beloved mother used to sew “Chehel Tekeh” which literally means 40 pieces; the closest translation for it is Patchwork. I grew up to love this art form. As an educator of forty years, collage was always part of the pedagogical curriculum for my students of all ages particularly the youth. I had learned that to make collage means to think deep and to have perseverance. These were teaching goals that my students and I achieved with great success while making collages. After retiring at age 62, I started to create collage as a skilled artist. Collage creation became my only way of expressing myself while utilizing my life experiences, education, and vision for a better world.

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Poem a Week
by Gary Michael Dault

Failure to Launch
(to Elon Musk)

the failure
of chocolate
as a fuel
for the candied trip
to Mars
left scientists
in their vanilla smocks
in their swatches of untried being
mute as pylons
during the urgency
and poignancy
of countdown

a launch leaves
both clinging
and calculating hearts
to leaf out
like ivy
through a thousand
immobilities

confectionary space
is laced with
the wrappings
of succulent failure

 

 

Greenwood
by Kai Chan

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ProTesT
by Cem Turgay


STAY WITH ART. INDEXG B&B

Located on the second floor of an art space, INDEXG Bed and Breakfast has 4 guest rooms, all with ensuite bathroom. Since 2008, INDEXG B&B have served curators, artists, art-admirers, collectors and professionals from different cities visiting and working in Toronto.

INDEXG B&B
50 Gladstone Ave, Toronto
416.535.6957
indexgbb.com

 

DOUBLE DOUBLE

View Current Issue
https://oceanpounds.com/blogs/doubledouble/1009-2020

Self-portraits of two photographers, written by Holly Lee / Holly descending the staircase from the third floor to the gallery, ready to go out to make a photograph at Trinity Bellwoods Park, a portrait. By Lee Ka-sing

 

 

Some Trees
by Malgorzata Wolak Dault

 

Number 43

In an essay in The Crowning Privilege (1955), poet Robert Graves spends some time in praise of American modernist poet, e.e.cummings--an unlikely enthusiasm for Graves, the arch classicist and poetic mythologist. Amusingly, Graves praises cummings for being unabashed "to write, endite and publicly recite so intrinsically corny a sonnet as the one beginning":

i thank You God for most this amazing
day: for the leaping greenly spirits of trees
and a blue dream of sky and for everything
which is natural which is infinite which is yes

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Travelling Palm Snapshots
by Tamara Chatterjee

Canada (June, 2019) – With summer's end, it is apparent that the usual summer spectacles will reconvene at a later date. Farewell pandemic summer; summer of uncertainty, summer of hibernation, sunny summer of corona.

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From the Notebooks (2010-2020)
by Gary Michael Dault

From the Notebooks, 2010-2020.
Number 54: Dove (January 16, 2011)

This dove--though the drawing in my notebook is only a few inches high--strikes me as somehow immense. But of course as an emblem of peace, a dove needs all the heft it can muster to minister to our queasy and tattered planet.

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CHEEZ
by Fiona Smyth

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The Raw and the Cooked, MYTHOLOGIQUES
(A column on the culture of eating and cooking)

 

Recipes
words and photo by Kai Chan

The first time I read a cooking recipe was after I moved to Canada. It seemed to me to use a recipe, one has to prepare all the ingredients accordingly, and then follow the step by step instruction in cooking. I was amusingly thinking that would takes away all the fun in cooking. However, since I love eating and I wanted to learn the western way in preparing food, I decided to learn to use recipes . Now after reading a lot of cook books and have collected a few recipes, I admit that recipes have taught me a lot about food and their preparation.

I like to go the market and see what is there then choose the items that please me. Then, it would be fun to figuring out what to make with the ingredients at hand. Sometime I do shop based on a recipe to prepare for a specific meal. In that case I like to follow the Japanese example to eat according to seasons.

The first cook book I bought is Elizabeth David’s “Spices, Salt and Aromatic in the English Kitchen”, in which she gives out recipes like telling the most fascinated stories. Here is an example of a recipe in the book for a simple and delicious cold hors/ d’oeuvre, “coriander mushrooms”:

Ingredients for three people are: 6 oz. of firm, white, round and very fresh mushrooms, a teaspoon of coriander seeds, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, lemon juice, salt, freshly milled pepper and one or two bayleaves.

Rinse the mushrooms, wipe them dry with a clean cloth, slice them into quarters, or if they are large into eighths. The stalks should be neatly trimmed. Squeeze over them a little lemon juice.

In a heavy frying pan or sauté pan, warm the olive oil. Into it put the coriander seeds, which should be ready crushed in a mortar. Let them heat for a few seconds. Keep the heat low. Put in the mushrooms and the bayleaves. Add the seasoning. Let the mushrooms cook gently for a minute, cover the pan and levee them, still over very low heat, for another three to five minutes.

Uncover the pan. Decant mushroom - with all their juices - into a shallow serving dish and sprinkle them with fresh olive oil and lemon juice.

Whether the mushrooms are to b served hot or cold do not forget to put the bay leaf which has cooked with them into the serving dish.

The combined scents of coriander and bay go to make up part of the true essence of the dish. In larger quantities the same dish can be made as a hot vegetable to be eaten with veal or chicken.

 


The Raw and the Cooked, MYTHOLOGIQUES is a new column on the culture of eating and cooking, with contributions by various authors. The column name is borrowed from the title of a book by Claude Levi-Strauss. It is spontaneous, a little amusing but serious at the same time.

 

 

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MONDAY ARTPOST
Published on Mondays
with columns by Artist and Writer
ISSN 1918-6991
Published since 2002, an Ocean and Pounds publication

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